The City said marshals were deployed in Sea Point on November 2, already, and are expected to be deployed in Bellville by the end of March 2022. File picture: African News Agency (ANA)
The City said marshals were deployed in Sea Point on November 2, already, and are expected to be deployed in Bellville by the end of March 2022. File picture: African News Agency (ANA)

City of Cape Town forging ahead with the redeployment of parking marshals

By Sisonke Mlamla Time of article published Nov 23, 2021

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Cape Town - The City said it was in the process of concluding a clamping protocol to have the wheels of repeat offenders who refuse to pay parking fines clamped.

Once finalised, fines for parking violations would range between R300 and R1 000, depending on the violation.

This after the City announced the deployment and the return of parking marshals to the Cape Town CBD, Claremont and Newlands, saying it would resume charging a tariff for the use of on-street parking bays next Monday to ensure a turnover of bays for those visiting the area.

Upper Claremont Ratepayers and Residents Association (UCRRA) supported the redeployment of the parking marshals but suggested additional duties for them to assist with traffic safety in their area.

The association said the marshals could assist by policing the streets surrounding Cavendish to deter and report illegal parking to the Traffic Department.

“They should have a presence on main roads to try to deter and report dangerous stopping of taxis on Main Road, and act as a visible presence to try and deter speeding and poor driving, and thus improve pedestrian safety,” said the association.

The City said marshals were deployed in Sea Point on November 2, already, and are expected to be deployed in Bellville by the end of March 2022.

The management of parking was temporarily suspended since the start of the Covid-19 pandemic last year.

“Given the much-needed surge in economic activity and anticipated arrival of tourists and visitors over the festive season, the City is resuming management to ensure a turnover of bays in popular areas and where people do business,” the City said.

Stop CoCT founder Sandra Dickson said parking marshals had in the past been viewed negatively by most people visiting the City centres as finding parking was a headache all round Cape Town.

Dickson said it had been reported that businesses welcomed official parking marshals as their presence discouraged people from parking in front of their businesses for full days and going to work.

Green Point Ratepayers’ and Residents Association (GPRRA) co-chairperson Liz Knight said there have not been parking marshals in their area.

Knight said motorists were flocking to their areas for on-street parking and they were extremely worried that more motorists would be arriving in their areas as the festive season was around the corner.

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